THE STORED WORKS

From the exhibition, PLOT at the Cable Street Gallery, London, 1998.

This first installation by Dunhill and O’Brien comprised of a selection of stored and packaged artworks (from their previous solitary art practices) grouped together and covered with tailor made vinyl jackets.
The covers were labelled at either end with words selected from the titles of the concealed artworks and appeared to be instructions on how to view the work.

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[ Photo: Edward Woodman ] - [ Click image to enlarge ]
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[ Photo: Edward Woodman ] - [ Click image to enlarge ]
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FROM AN ARCHIVE OF THE STORED WORKS OF DUNHILL AND O’BRIEN, WITH TITLES 1998, various materials and dimensions.

Packed up and stowed away, stored works inhabit darkened spaces in the studio and face an uncertain future. Lurking somewhere is the possibility that a work may be shown again at some point, and it can be just too awkward or dismal to throw some things away.

Initially we thought of the new hybrid forms generated in this work as being the product of a ‘third person’ someone who might sit outside our personal preferences.

An aromatherapist we once heard interviewed on the radio talked about her sense of smell and how acute it had become. She could recognise and appreciate the most delicate aromas but she could also smell rush hour from her room with the windows shut and was concious of different types of anxiety in strangers by the way they smelled.

Similarly if you are involved in objects, certain things like wall to wall carpets, can be difficult to tolerate. This isn’t a matter of taste, it is a physical and spatial thing. The ‘wall to wall’ can suffocate the surface of a room and blur important angles. Covering something is far from neutral even when there are sound practical reasons for doing it.

Covering things may disable them but it also reveals something about their form and scale. In our past ‘solo’ work we have both covered things in various ways (laminated paper, rendered concrete, layers of lacquer etc). In ‘An Archive of the Lost Works of Dunhill and O’Brien, with Titles’, the vinyl covers were lovingly made, they were a labour of love.

Dunhill and O’Brien 1998

for the essay by Chris Dorsett from The Lost Works of Dunhill and O’Brien see http://www.chrisdorsett.org.uk/2007/cat_essays/presents.html